Faculty of Law


Written work

All written work, whether submitted for tutorials, opinions, research papers or dissertations must comply with the New Zealand Law Style Guide.

All written work, whether submitted for tutorials, opinions, research papers or dissertations must comply with the NZ Law Style Guide second edition (available for purchase from the Faculty Reception office).

Essays, opinions and other assignments should be typed where possible. Handwritten work is acceptable provided that it is clear and legible. If work submitted for grading is illegible, the lecturer may require that it be typed at the student’s expense. Students should also note that all quotations should be indicated by quotation marks and the source given. Never use material without giving the proper acknowledgement of source.

All students are encouraged to read the University’s Student Academic Conduct Statute which outlines strict provisions on the penalties for academic misconduct. In addition, the University’s online Academic Integrity Course is another very useful resource designed to increase student knowledge of academic integrity, university rules relating to academic conduct, and the identification and consequences of academic misconduct.

 

Anonymised Assignment and Submission Process

All assignments submitted must be anonymised i.e. with NO NAMES.

Assignments for all courses must be submitted both in hard copy and electronic format (Microsoft Word) by 12 noon on the due date or the student will be penalised.

The penalty for lateness is 10% for each day or part of day thereof in which the assessment is submitted late.  This is also applicable if students submit an electronic copy on time but submit a hard copy late.  For this purpose, a weekend (Friday-Monday) counts as 2 days (20% penalty).  A submission is incomplete unless the student submits a paper and electronic version of the assessment (unless otherwise stated).  

The penalty for students who submit a paper copy on time but an electronic copy late is 5%.  Students will only be able to challenge a lateness penalty for late electronic submission if they can prove a technical malfunction. In order to do so a copy of the receipt of submission will be required. A mark will not be released until both electronic and paper copies are submitted.    Students are recommended to download and save a copy of the digital receipt for their own records and to ensure electronic submission has been successful.

The assignment submission consists of two steps:

1.       The hard copy, with the online coversheet completed from within Canvas (which includes confirmation of the actual word count as per Microsoft Word) is to be submitted to the Law School Student Centre Reception;

AND

2.       The identical electronic Microsoft Word version of the assignment is to be uploaded through Turnitin via Canvas.

The electronic version of the assignment must include the student’s identification number and the alphanumeric course code both in the filename and header.  The student’s first name/s and surname MUST NOT BE INCLUDED anywhere on the assignment.  Documents must be uploaded in Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx) format.

Submission of an assignment is completed only when both the hard copy and the identical electronic copy have been submitted by 12 noon on the due date.

Students experiencing problems with electronic submission should contact the Law Student Centre Reception or lawacademicservices@auckland.ac.nz prior to the due date and time.

See also Late Submission of Work/Penalties

 

Cheating, Plagiarism and Turnitin

Cheating is viewed as a serious offence by the University of Auckland.  Penalties are administered by the School and by the University’s Discipline Committee, and may include a fine, suspension or expulsion from the University.  See the University’s pages on Academic Integrity at www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/home/about/teaching-learning/academic-integrity.

If, after an investigation, a student is found to have cheated, in addition to any penalty, that student’s name will be recorded in a Register held by the University and may be forwarded to the New Zealand Law Society when an application for Admission as Barrister and Solicitor is made.

Plagiarism means using the work of others in preparing an assignment and presenting it as your own without explicitly acknowledging – or referencing – where it came from.  Plagiarism can also mean not acknowledging the full extent of indebtedness to a source.  Work can be plagiarised from many sources – including books, articles, the internet, and other students’ assignments.  Plagiarism can also occur unconsciously or inadvertently.  Direct copying is definitely plagiarism.  Paraphrasing of another’s work without attribution is also plagiarism.  Submitting someone else’s unattributed or less than fully attributed work or ideas is not evidence of your own grasp of the material and cannot earn you marks.  Plagiarism can also occur in an open-book examination.  If you copy from a case or a text it must be acknowledged.

Note: Plagiarism applies to all levels of work, including theses and dissertations.

In submitting assignments, students are required to attach a cover sheet which is completed from within Canvas.  This includes a declaration that the work is completely the student’s own work, and that materials from other sources have been properly acknowledged and referenced.

The Law School subscribes to the Turnitin originality checking service.  The University of Auckland will not tolerate cheating, or assisting others to cheat, and views cheating in coursework as a serious academic offence.  A student’s assessed work will be reviewed against electronic source material using computerised detection mechanisms.  Students will be required to provide an electronic version of their work (in Microsoft Word) for computerised review.

All students are encouraged to read the University’s Student Academic Conduct Statute which outlines strict provisions on the penalties for academic misconduct.  In addition, the University’s compulsory online Academic Integrity Course is designed to increase student knowledge of academic integrity, university rules relating to academic conduct, and the identification and consequences of academic misconduct.

Word limits


Word limits apply to all written assignments (other than theses) as follows:

  • Tutorial Essays: 1500 words (750 words for LAW 131 Legal Method)
  • Written assignments in 10-pt, 15-pt and 20-pt electives: as specified in course outlines
  • Paper in lieu of examination (PILO) in 10-pt, 15-pt and 20-pt electives: as specified in course outlines.  The PILO is in lieu of the examination only; all other coursework requirements must be completed.
  • Supervised research papers: 10,000 words
  • Honours seminar papers: 10,000 words
  • Honours dissertations: 15,000 words

The above limits are fixed subject to a 5% leeway above the limit, and students will be penalised for exceeding the limits at a rate of 5 marks for every 10% (or part thereof) over the limit.  There is no penalty applied for an assessment falling under the word limit.

All words including footnotes will be included in the word count.  A footnote is defined in the OED as ‘A note, reference, or additional piece of information printed at the bottom of a page, used to explain or comment on something in the main body of the text on the same page’.

The following are NOT included within the definition of words: the title of the assessment, headers and footers (footers does not include footnotes, which are included in the word count, but does include page numbers), bibliography, table of contents, table of cases, an abstract.

An appendix which contains material referred to in the main text is not included in the word count.

Tables in the text, and heading of sections of the text, are included in the word count.

In the event of doubt as to what is included, students should contact lawacademicservices@auckland.ac.nz before submission.

 

Late submission of work/penalties

To apply for an extension, students need to contact a Student Academic and Support Adviser and supply documentation (e.g. doctor’s certificate) before the due date.  Lecturers and tutors may not grant extensions nor do they have any authority to vary penalties.  Retrospective approval for an extension will be given only in exceptional circumstances.  Except where the Student Academic and Support Adviser has authorised an extension of time for the submission of student work, work handed in after the deadline will be penalised at the rate of 10% of the marks awarded for the assignment for each day or part thereof.  For this purpose, a weekend (Friday-Monday) counts as 2 days (20% penalty).  This applies to all written work: opinions, tutorial essays, internally-assessed papers, supervised research papers, papers in lieu of examinations, honours papers, Master’s research papers and seminar papers.  Lateness penalties for take-home examinations vary depending on the length of the take-home exam.  Applicable penalties and the format of  submission of take-home examinations will be advised in course outlines and/or via Canvas.  .

Submission of written work is only complete when both a hard copy and electronic copy (in Microsoft Word via Turnitin in Canvas) have been submitted.  Failure to submit either a hard or electronic copy counts as late submission.  See also Anonymised Assignments and Submission Process

 

Aegrotats and compassionate consideration

Students wishing to apply for compassionate consideration for written work should contact the Student Centre and Development Manager, Dr Suranjika Tittawella, to apply for an extension of time before the due date.  Retrospective approval will be given only in exceptional circumstances.  Approval for an extension of time cannot be given by the lecturer or marker for the subject concerned.

Students wishing to apply for an aegrotat for a test or exam apply through University Health Services (even if you see your own doctor or counsellor).  Forms are available from the Student Health and Counselling Service, Level 3 Student Commons Building, and must be submitted within seven days of the test or exam.  Students are advised to make an appointment with the Student Health and Counselling Service or their own registered medical doctor on the day of the test or as close to the test day as possible.  It is particularly important to do so on the day of your exam if you want to apply for consideration of your exam performance.

More information including processes for aegrotat and compassionate considerate can be found at www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/cs-aegrotat-and-compassionate-consideration.