Public Lecture - Professor Martin Ruf Event as iCalendar

(Faculty of Law events, Lectures, New Zealand Centre for Law and Business)

23 February 2017

5:30pm

When Thursday 23 February 2017 
Where
Small Lecture Theatre, Building 803, 17 Eden Crescent
Time 5.30pm
Refreshments
6.30pm. Staff Common Room, Level 4, Building 801, 9 Eden Cr
Professor Martin Ruf

The New Zealand Centre for Law and Business is delighted to invite you to the first of its seminars in 2017 - Professor Martin Ruf speaking on Taxation and International Mergers and Acquisitons.

Abstract: International Mergers and Acquisitions are responsible for around 50% of worldwide Foreign Direct Investment. Taxation affects this important form of business investment in several ways: (1) Repatriation/withholding taxes maydisadvantage certain acquirers, (2) Capital gains taxation may deter owners from selling targets, (3) Tax planning as well as its restrictions through anti-avoidance rules (eg, earnings stripping rules) may impact the direction and volume of international M&A.

This presentation illustrates to which extent these forms of taxation affect international M&A and considers what implications policy makers should draw from this analysis.

Bio: Professor Martin Ruf is a professor of International Business Taxation at the Business School of the University of Tuebingen in Germany (ranked 89 in the Times Higher Education World University rankings). His main research area is taxation and international mergers & acquisitions, which includes research on capital gains taxation and the economic effects of anti-avoidance rules, especially CFC rules.

He has published in leading tax law journals (World Tax Journal, Nordic Tax Journal, National Tax Journal and German tax law journals) as well as in leading journals in economics such as the Economic Journal, the Journal of Public Economics and International Tax and Public Finance. Prior to joining academia Martin practised for one of the leading German tax legal firms Flick Gocke Schaumburg.

Please RSVP to lawevents@auckland.ac.nz by Monday 20 February